Alburquerque, Nuevo México / New Mexico (US)
21-22 sep

Friday:
Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino (Italy)
Coreyah (South Korea)
Delgres (Guadeloupe)
Iris DeMent (U.S.)
Youssra El Hawary (Egypt)
Jupiter & Okwess (Democratic Republic of Congo)
LADAMA (Brazil/Colombia/Venezuela/U.S.)
Lluvia Negra Band (Taos, New Mexico)
Los de Abajo (Mexico)

Saturday:
Antonia Apodaca and Friends (Las Vegas, New Mexico)
Aynur (Kurdish/Turkey)
Coreyah (South Korea)
Youssra El Hawary (Egypt)
Jarlath Henderson (Ireland)
La Dame Blanche (Cuba)
Lemon Bucket Orkestra (Canada)
New Mexico Pueblo Celebration featuring Sky City Buffalo Ram Dance Group (Acoma) & Jemez Seasonal Dancers (Jemez and Zuni Pueblos)
Martha Redbone (Cherokee/Choctaw/Appalachian)
Rio Mira (Ecuador/Colombia)

Antonia Apodaca and Friends (Las Vegas, New Mexico)

Antonia ApodacaPlease join us in honoring 94-year-old New Mexico legend Antonia Apodaca at this year’s festival. This state treasure was part of the second ¡Globalquerque! She’ll be joined by David Garcia and Bernardo Jaramillo, with background narration and stories from her son Jose Apodaca, as well as special guests Chuy Martinez and Oti Ruiz.

Apodaca, now in her 80th year of performing, has become an icon in the history of New Mexican folk music. She is musician and songwriter known for her performances of traditional New Mexico music. Her instruments are accordion and guitar, along with her passionate voice and treasure chest of traditional music.

From a family of musicians, her mother played the accordion and guitar and her father the guitar, accordion, and violin. At the age of 18, she met her future husband, Macario “Max” Apodaca, a fiddler from Carmen (a village near Mora, N.M.). In 1949, they settled in Wyoming, where they lived for the next 30 years, performing together for both the Hispanic and Anglo communities at dances and local events and raising five children. After returning to New Mexico in 1979, she was awarded the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts in 1992, the same year she appeared at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C.

In 2010, Apodaca moved to Las Vegas and has continued to perform with Trio Jalapeño. Their concerts often include her own compositions, including “Estas Lindas Flores” (“These Beautiful Flowers”). In 2011 she was awarded the Premio Hilos Culturales, an annual award presented to folk artists from New Mexico and Colorado “who have distinguished themselves in their communities as folk musicians or folk dancers of traditional southwest styles of Canciones Del Pasado or Bailes Antiguos.”

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Aynur (Kurdish/Turkey)

aynurOver the years Aynur has become one of the most well known musicians from Turkey and a representative for the Kurdish people. Her vocal style and her albums have been praised both by Turkish and international media. Her albums are best sellers in the genre of Kurdish folk.

Aynur’s music is based on traditional Kurdish folk songs, with many of them being at least 300 years old. Her lyrics are about the life and sufferings of Kurdish people, and in particular, Kurdish women. Musically, she tries to blend Kurdish with Western music, creating her own style and interpreting her traditional repertoire in a modern and fresh way.

She has collaborated with famous musicians and bands including world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, Kayhan Kalhor, Javier Limón, and many others. She also appeared in Fatih Akın’s documentary movie “İstanbul Hatırası / Köprüyü Geçmek-Crossing the bridges” as a singer, and also appeared in the documentary about Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, “The Music of Strangers,” directed by Morgan Neville and released in 2015.

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Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino (Italy)

Canzoniere Grecanico SalentinoFormed by writer Rina Durante in 1975, Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino is regarded as Italy’s leading and longest-standing traditional music ensemble, hailing from the Salento, the heel of the Italian boot, in Puglia.

Italy’s fascinating dichotomy of tradition and modernity come together in the music of CGS: the seven-piece band and dancer are the leading exponents in a new wave of young performers reinventing Southern Italy’s Pizzica musical and dance traditions for today’s global audience.

The tens of thousands who often congregate for this Lecce-based band’s concerts in Italy know: Bandleader, fiddler, and drummer Mauro Durante and company can make an audience shimmy with the energy of the ancient ritual of pizzica tarantata, said to cure the taranta spider’s bite with its frenzied trance dances. CGS shows are a live explosion: full of energy, passion, rhythm and mystery, they bring the audience from the past into modernity, and back.

Leadership of the ensemble was handed down to Durante by his acclaimed father Daniele in 2007. CGS has revitalized both the rousing and the introspective sides of Southern Italian song and dance. Durante continues to innovate and energize, bringing decades of experience playing with global artists (Ballake Sissoko, Ibrahim Maalouf, Piers Faccini), contemporary classical composers (Ludovico Einaudi), and pop mavericks (Stewart Copeland of The Police).

Critically acclaimed with 18 albums and countless live performances throughout USA, Canada, Europe and the Middle East, in 2010 CGS was awarded Best Italian World Music Group at Italy’s MEI confab.

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Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino

 

Coreyah (South Korea)

CoreyahThere are few bands across the world that so expertly meld classic, traditional instruments and vocalization with entirely modern ones as Coreyah. Indeed, their new breed of music breaks the barrier between the traditional and the contemporary. Rooted in Korean folklore, Coreyah strives to create “living Korean music” by assimilating various world music heritages, such as Anglo-American rock, Balkan gypsy, and a variety of musical genres from South America and Africa.

The band is chock full of gifted musicians, consisting of Dong-Kun Kim (daegeum, sogeum, tungso), Boyoung Ham (vocals), Halee Jeong (geomungo, yanggeum), Cho-Rong Kim (janggu, jing, kkwaenggwari), Sangheum Park (guitar) and Kyungyi (percussion). Since their 2010 debut, Coreyah has been expanding its musical domain by actively blurring the distinction between old and new. In 2011, they won the grand prize at a new Korean music competition called “Cheonchamanbyeol (all kinds of music) Concert” hosted by BukchonChangwoo Theater. The following year, Coreyah proved that traditional Korean music could attract just as much attention as flashy rock, when they reached the top 16 on KBS (Korean Broadcasting System)’s “Top Band II,” a band survival show. They continue to delight audiences at home and abroad.

The name of the group, the Sino-Korean homonym Co-Re-Yah, refers to inheritance of the past, but now serves to draw living modern people toward more attractive music using old music elements. Translated into Hangul (the Korean alphabet), Coreyah also means “whale”—the group’s totem animal and good luck charm.

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Coreyah

 

Delgres (Guadeloupe)

DelgresDelgres gives voice to their ancestors, slaves from the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe who found refuge in New Orleans. The music, performed by Pascal Danae, guitar and vocals, Rafgee on the sousaphone and Baptiste Brondy on drums and vocals, is a mystical, swampy blend of Mississippi Delta blues, Caribbean rhythms and Big Easy funk and drive.

Born in Paris to Caribbean parents, Pascal has searched for the link between his love of the blues, and his ancestral home of Guadeloupe. This captivating trio is named after Louis Delgrès, the officer of African descent who gave his life on the island fighting against Napoleon’s enforced reinstatement of slavery in 1802. Delgres poses the musical question, “Just where did the blues come from?” The answer may prove elusive, but in Delgres’ music, it seems the connection has been made.

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Delgres

 

Iris DeMent (U.S.)

Iris DeMentBeginning with her 1992 debut, Infamous Angel, which was hailed as “an essential album of the 1990’s” by Rolling Stone, Iris DeMent released a series of stellar records that established her as “one of the finest singer-songwriters in America,” according to The Guardian. The music earned her multiple Grammy nominations, as well as the respect of peers like John Prine, Steve Earle, and Emmylou Harris, who all invited her to collaborate. Merle Haggard dubbed her “the best singer I’ve ever heard” and asked her to join his touring band, and David Byrne and Natalie Merchant famously covered her “Let The Mystery Be” as a duet on MTV Unplugged. DeMent returned in 2012 with Sing The Delta, which prompted NPR to call her “one of the great voices in contemporary popular music” and The Boston Globe to hail the collection as “a work of rare, unvarnished grace and power.”

The Trackless Woods, DeMent’s sixth studio album, is unlike anything else in her illustrious career. The lyrics are poems by Russian poet Anna Akhmatova, as translated by Babette Deutsch and Lyn Coffin, set to compositions by DeMent. “Her whole adult working life was marked by this constant struggle to do her work in the face of the Bolshevik Revolution, World War I, World War II, and Stalin,” DeMent says of Akhmatova. “The estimates are that between 20-80 million people died during those 30 years he was in power. One of her husbands was executed, one died in the gulag, and her son was sent there twice just by virtue of being her son. She often lived in poverty and out of other people’s homes, never owned a place of her own. She wasn’t some elevated star figure exempted from suffering, she was right there in it. All of her poetry came out of that.” Akhmatova’s struggles weren’t unique for her time in Russia, but her poetry still managed to find beauty in a world of pain and ugliness, which DeMent believes is what makes her so deeply loved by the Russian people.

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Youssra El Hawary (Egypt)

Youssra El HawaryYoussra El Hawary’s socially-aware, personal, and original music innovates as much in content as it does in style. In the half-decade since she became a slyly defiant sensation in the aftermath of the Egyptian revolution, El Hawary continues to be a bellwether of everyday life. With charismatic charm, her lithe compositions capture the stories of Cairo, and the charged alchemy of the Mediterranean basin that fuels her distinctive and soulful sound. Her first album No’oum Nasyeen (which roughly translates to We Forget When Morning Comes), was released earlier this year. El Hawary was the first Egyptian artist to finance the production of an album via a crowdfunding campaign.

Her expressive presence on stage and unique musical style has helped her capture audience attention. She has become one of the most outspoken female voices in Egypt, and received a lot of attention for her first music video, “El Soor” (“The Wall”), a biting political commentary about the situation in Egypt.

“Perfect, easy magic. I’m totally hooked on music by this folkie-ish, indie-ish, chanson-ish singer/songwriter from Egypt armed not with a guitar, but… an accordion.” (NPR Music)

Center StageYoussra El Hawary will tour the U.S. in Fall 2018 as part of Center Stage, an exchange program of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, produced by the New England Foundation for the Arts. From July-December, Center Stage will bring three contemporary music ensembles from Egypt to the U.S. for month-long tours. Residencies will include performances, workshops, discussions, people-to-people exchanges, and community gatherings.

Youssra El Hawary’s visit was made possible in part from a grant from New Mexico ArtsWESTAF, the Western States Arts Federation; and the National Endowment for the Arts.

NMA - NEA - Westaf

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Jarlath Henderson (Ireland)

Jarlath HendersonHailing from County Armagh, Ireland, Jarlath Henderson is the first Irish solo artist to win the prestigious BBC Young Folk Musician of the Year Award, which has led to performances at festivals throughout Europe and to GlobalFest in New York City. Jarlath combines modern, rhythmically intense, percussive electronics to his traditional singing style to create signature sound that is all his own. He is a masterful balladeer, three times “All-­­Ireland Champion” Uilleann Piper, a teacher both in Ireland and Scotland and has featured in numerous BBC television programs on piping and music. A talented and versatile multi-instrumentalist, Jarlath also plays whistle, flute and cittern.

Henderson featured on the soundtrack to Pixar’s 2013 hit “Brave,” while other recording work includes sessions with numerous folk luminaries including the Peatbog Faeries, Wolfstone, Luke Daniels, Maggie Reilly and Duncan Chisholm, plus genre-spanning Irish soprano/fiddler Deirdre Moynihan and award-winning Belfast poet Gearóid Mac Lochlainn. And in tandem with all this music, he’s somehow found time to qualify as a doctor, studying for five years at Aberdeen before moving to his current base of Glasgow, juggling gigs with hospital shifts to complete his pre-specialist training.

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Jarlath Henderson

 

Jupiter & Okwess (Democratic Republic of Congo)

Jupiter and OkwessAnimated Afro-funk, hip-hopping grooves, high-speed guitar jams: Jupiter Bokondji’s music reflects his many experiences. Born in Kinshasa, he began drumming as a boy, helping his grandmother, a traditional healer, at ceremonies and funerals. In 1974, his diplomat father was posted to East Berlin, where Jupiter discovered rock music. He returned to Kinshasa convinced the music he’d heard in Europe was rooted in the history of the Congo’s 450 ethnic groups and that music could be a unifying force.

He traveled the country, developing his style. By 1990, he was touring the continent with Okwess International. In 2007, after civil war chaos, he became the subject of a French documentary, “Jupiter’s Dance.” The attention took him to Europe, collaborations with Damon Albarn, his breakthrough album Hotel Univers, WOMAD, Glastonbury, Europe and Japan. His latest album, 2017’s Kin Sonic, “blends political critique with storytelling and engrossing rhythms, offering a kaleidoscopic soundscape of today’s Congo.” (Africa Express)

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Jupiter and Okwess

 

LADAMA (Brazil/Colombia/Venezuela/U.S.)

LADAMALADAMA is a group of four women, virtuosic musicians, and educators—Lara Klaus, Daniela Serna, Mafer Bandola and Sara Lucas—each from a different country and culture of the Americas, who are sisters in song, rhythm and spirit. Harnessing music from their respective countries of origin—Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela and the United States—the group utilizes traditional and non-traditional instruments from across the Americas, but with a modern twist, to produce Latin Alternative music.

LADAMA’s debut, self-titled album could not be more timely; both Latin America and the United States, in fact the world, are in need of projects that transcend boundaries and defy norms. This is precisely what LADAMA, crafted carefully on a journey through Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela and New York, represents. It delivers a fresh take on a myriad of traditional, Pan-American rhythms all coming together seamlessly into LADAMA’s unique blend of enthralling sounds.

LADAMA met on the road in 2014 while touring Los Angeles, Arizona, and New Mexico as part of the prestigious OneBeat Program. Between individual performances, leading youth workshops and public music-making events, Lara, Daniela, Mafer and Sara uncovered a common dream of building communities through sound and empowering women and youth through music.

LADAMA’s visit was made possible in part from a grant from New Mexico ArtsWESTAF, the Western States Arts Federation; and the National Endowment for the Arts.

NMA - NEA - Westaf

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LADAMA

 

La Dame Blanche (Cuba)

La Dame BlancheWith her explosive mix of hip-hop, cumbia, dancehall and reggae, the Cuban singer, flautist and percussionist Yaite Ramos Rodriguez, a.k.a. La Dame Blanche, delivers a powerful and compelling sound which summons the spirits.

Yaite has traveled a long and sometimes hard road. Everything started in Cuba, where she was born in the heart of an awe-inspiring musical cauldron. Her father, Jesus “Aguaje” Ramos, is an exceptional trombonist who is also the artistic director of the Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club. Family parties are gatherings of extraordinary musicians, the cream of Cuban music, to the sounds of thousands of songs and drums.

“On paper, this shouldn’t really work: Afro-Cuban music, hip-hop, dancehall, cumbia and classical flute. But thanks to La Dame Blanche’s serious musical chops, the ‘Woman in White’ from Havana (by way of Paris) pulls off this stylistic hat-trick with outsized swagger and style.” (NPR Music)

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Lemon Bucket Orkestra (Canada)

Lemon Bucket OrkestraLemon Bucket Orkestra is a guerrilla-punk-Balkan-folk-brass band massive like no other. Tracing their genesis back to the streets of Toronto, the original quartet of busking troubadours quickly amassed a battalion of like-minded musical souls and the full-blown, dozen-plus strong Orkestra was born. The multi-award winning ensemble has been heralded as a groundbreaking, genre-bending phenomenon by the Canadian and international media alike and over the past eight years, they have performed on streets and stages around the world, leaving a trail of new friends and dedicated fans in their wake.

Equal parts exhilarating precision and reckless abandon, LBO’s live shows are a truly immersive experience—ranging from the ecstatic to the cathartic. They exquisitely captured that energy on their 2017 album If I Had The Strength. “The album is a statement of resistance and celebration,” says LBO’s Mark Marczyk. “We’re guerrilla-folk party-punks imprisoned and liberated by Eastern European folklore. The title track (borrowed from the late great Adrienne Cooper) says it all: ‘If I had the strength, I would run in the streets—I would scream PEACE! PEACE! PEACE!’ This album records the process of gathering that strength and the obstacles we encounter along the way.”

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Lemon Bucket Orkestra

 

Lluvia Negra Band (Taos, New Mexico)

Lluvia Negra

The members of Lluvia Negra Band have all been playing music since they were young children—their parents were all musicians who performed in and around Taos. They met when they played for the St. Francis Church Choir in Rancho de Taos, where they have been performing as the St. Francis Choir every Sunday since 2001, along with playing gospel music on Sunday mornings at the Taos Fiestas for close to 20 years. They love Taos and are proud of their culture and heritage, which have flourished in Northern New Mexico.

When Lluvia Negra (“Black Rain,” after a thunderstorm that raged during one of their early rehearsals) formed, they started playing around Taos, Espanola, Santa Fe and Southern Colorado at clubs and private parties. They play country, Spanish, rock, and gospel music. Their song “Chile Verde Rock” has proven to be especially popular, winning a Los 15 Grandes De Nuevo Mexico Award and the 2017 Hispano Music Award for Crossover Song of the Year. State Sen. Pete Campos (Las Vegas, N.M.) drew up a Senate Memorial recommending that New Mexico consider adopting it as the official New Mexico Chile Song, calling it “a musical tribute to chile that is worthy of bringing to this humble vegetable the accolades it deserves.”

“Chile Verde Rock” and “Maria Angel del Cielo” both reached #1 at radio stations in Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Espanola, and are presently being played all over the state and in Southern Colorado.

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Lluvia Negra Band

 

Los de Abajo (Mexico)

Los De AbajoLos de Abajo started as friends, university students living the day-to-day hard reality experienced by the Mexican people, before they began searching for the perfect musical tool to spread information and denounce injustice.

Los de Abajo, the band, their name taken from Mexican writer Mariano Azuela’s novel of the same name, forged their identity on a revolutionary spirit, playing at students’ and workers’ rallies, with artists, Zapatista soldiers, gay and women’s rights movements, and many other groups of free-thinkers from outside the mainstream.

On Sept. 15, 1992, Los de Abajo played at the Mexican Independence Anniversary; this performance was the first step in a long road of struggle for a different way of living and thinking. Immersed in a Mexico with a long history of poverty, suffocated by the oligarchy, plunder, and corruption, the group’s combative and energy-filled fusion of music has been influenced by the global nature of our times. Using their music, made up of salsa, merengue, cumbia, punk, rap, reggae, rock, and Mexican traditions such as son Jarocho, Northern music, and banda sinaloense, Los de Abajo began to spread information and ideas. After all these years full of experience, struggle and learning, Los de Abajo continue to offer a powerful and danceable musical experience.

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Los de Abajo

 

New Mexico Pueblo Celebration featuring Sky City Buffalo Ram Dance Group (Acoma) & Jemez Seasonal Dancers (Jemez and Zuni Pueblos)

Sky City dance groupMC’ed by Emmett “Shkeme” Garcia

The Sky City Buffalo Ram Dance Group is comprised of children, teenagers and young adults ages 7 to 22 from the Pueblo of Acoma, N.M. Acoma Pueblo, located 70 miles west of Albuquerque, is one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the United States and also known worldwide as the “Sky City.” The dances we share represent prayer, all the wildlife and to bring peace and good spirits to mankind. May the songs that are created and danced bring you happiness and peace in your heart & souls.

The Seasonal Dance Group from the Pueblo of Jemez (Walatowa) in north central New Mexico is led by Lawrence Toya, who formed the group in 1990. Lawrence was a member of a Jemez Pueblo Dance Group in the late 1970s, and his memorable dance performances include the New Mexico State Fair, where he met his wife, Ruby N. Toya of Zuni Pueblo, in 1979. She too was a member of a Zuni Pueblo Dance Group under the leadership of Chester Mahooty. They were married and began a family the following year. Influenced by their cultural heritage and love of song and dance, they wanted to teach their sons Glendon and Delvin to carry on the same cultural values.

The Seasonal Dance Group was formed to promote the cultures and languages of the Jemez and Zuni Pueblos, and the dance group is comprised of both Walatowa and Shiwi tribes. Aside from participating in tribal events throughout the year, the group also performs dances at many functions throughout the United States.

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Martha Redbone (Cherokee/Choctaw/Appalachian)

Martha RedboneMartha Redbone is one of today’s most vital voices in American Roots music. A multi award-winning musician, the charismatic songstress is celebrated for her tasty gumbo of roots music embodying the folk and mountain blues sounds of her childhood in the Appalachian hills of Kentucky mixed with the eclectic grit of her teenage years in pre-gentrified Brooklyn. With the power of her gospel singing African-American father’s voice and the determined spirit of her Cherokee/Shawnee/Choctaw mother, Redbone broadens all boundaries of Americana. Her latest CD, The Garden of Love: Songs of William Blake, produced by Nitty Gritty Dirt Band founder/Grammy winner John McEuen, is an unexpected twist—“a brilliant collision of cultures” (New Yorker) featuring Martha’s magnificent voice, Blake’s immortal words and a masterful cornucopia of roots music (folk, country, Piedmont blues, gospel, bluegrass, soul and traditional Southeastern Native American).

Alongside her career as a recording artist and songwriter, Martha Redbone has maintained a steady involvement with causes she believes in. Ms. Redbone is contracted by The Department of Indian Education-Louisiana, LaFourche Parish, and teaches Southeastern Traditional Singing Workshops for the United Houma Nation’s Bayou Healers Cultural Enrichment Camp program.

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Rio Mira (Ecuador/Colombia)

Rio MiraRio Mira is a marimba supergroup with Afro-Pacific binational heritage consisting of some of the most in-demand and respected musicians from Colombia and Ecuador. Their music is the sonic rejoining of the region known as El Pacífico Sur, one connected by history, ecology and culture and divided by the national borders of Ecuador and Colombia.

The people throughout this area have similar music, food, speech, fashion, and background, and it is no coincidence that the band takes its name from the Mira River that flows across these borders, connecting rather than dividing people and cultures. This area is home to a great many people of African descent and the rhythms of Africa have become entwined with the lilt and grooves of Colombia and Ecuador. Marimba music has become firmly established, a sound so sacred it was added to UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2015.

Their album Marimba Del Pacifico is a beguiling showcase of this protected sound, a celebration of a unique cultural heritage found nowhere else on the planet, by a band of young musicians keeping this strong tradition alive.

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Rio Mira